The Brain-Gut Axis Matters

Gut-Brain-Connection

Gut-brain connection and happiness.

Your state of mind starts deep inside.

There is an increasing body of research connecting the state of your gut to the state of your mind. This means if you have occasional digestive issues, it could be impacting your gut-brain axis, and with it your mood, mental clarity, cravings, and ability to cope with stress. And the impact goes both ways: If you are going through a particularly stressful period, you are more likely to experience minor digestive issues, which can create a vicious cycle. Taking care of your gut is taking care of your state of mind:

+ Over 50% people with digestive complaints also complain of feeling under-par emotionally

+ Digestive symptoms are often accompanied by increased stress responses 

+ 95% of the body’s serotonin is produced in the gut; the shortage of which is linked to mood swings, blues, loss of appetite, and irregular sleep

 

Gut-Brain-Axis

 

Your second brain

Why your gut feelings matter.

Scientists call the gut the ‘second brain’ because the gut has its own nervous system, called the Enteric Nervous System (ENS), that functions independently from the brain. In fact, when the vagus nerve, that connects the gut and brain is cut, the gut continues to operate on its own.

Your brain-gut axis. Taking care of your “second brain” means: 

+ Taking care of your Enteric Nervous System that provides many commands to your brain and body
+ Upholding the 100 million neurons on the wall of your small intestine ( more than those in your spinal cord) that generate hormones and neurotransmitters that regulate your physical and emotional processes
+ Helping improve the communication signals from your “gut brain” to your “head brain” via the vagus nerve, which sends more signals from gut to brain than it receives back

Brain-Gut-Axis-Balance

The brain-gut cycle.

Don’t let stress make it vicious.

Stress diminishes healthy bacteria and may slow down the production of enzymes. This shift in gut balance may promote digestive discomfort, and a compromised gut causes stress. If you are experiencing occasional digestive complaints you are more likely to experience mood swings, brain fog, cravings and less ability to cope with stress.

+ Stress diminishes healthy bacteria in the gut

The research confirms what we instinctively know: Maintaining a healthy digestive system and absorbing maximum nutrition is key to feeling emotionally and mentally balanced.*

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LEARN: 

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